Daily Life in Ancient Roman Cities!

Here is a link to a video that tours a Roman home, courtesy of  http://ancientvine.com/.  This is a fabulous website with great 3-d images of the ancient world.  Check it out!

http://www.ancientvine.com/houseofthevine.html

image courtesy of http://ancientvine.com/

image courtesy of http://ancientvine.com/

 

Lots more information:

http://www.ducksters.com/history/ancient_rome_food_daily_life.php

http://www.pbs.org/empires/romans/empire/family.html

http://library.thinkquest.org/26602/society.htm

http://rome.mrdonn.org/dailylife.html

Roman board games:

http://ablemedia.com/ctcweb/showcase/boardgames.html

Ancient Roman Engineering and Construction

Roman Arch and Concrete

Romans used the arch to build huge projects, such as bridges aqueducts, sports arenas, mansions, bath housed and roads.  Romans invented concrete which was used to create these huge projects.  This new technology was a mix of water, small stones, lime and ash.  “Lime” is a Roman name for “cement”.  It is a mineral.

You can see at least 50 examples of arches and concrete in Tucson every day.  If you are reading this at chaparral, concrete is right below your feet!  After 2,000 years, we still depend on Ancient Roman Technology!

Ansel Adams (1902-1984)

Ansel Adams (1902-1984)

This is an example of Ancient Roman engineering (arches).  The photograph was taken in Tucson, in 1968, by the very famous artist, Ansel Adams.  Can you name the location?

Geography Games

Geography Game!

Give this a try!

http://www.mentalfloss.com/geographyzone/

Roman Road Construction!

Very informative video!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yu94sFmNwMw

 

From http://www.ducksters.com/history/ancient_roman_engineering.php:   Roman Roads were important to the economy and the military of the Romans. They allowed for easier commerce between towns and cities and also allowed the Roman Legions to move quickly around the expanding empire.

The roads were designed to last despite the environment. They were built using many layers of masonry including concrete. These durable roads are still used today. They were also built with a hump making water flow to the edges. This kept the roads from flooding and allowed them to be used in rainy weather.

roman road construction.jpg 2

Links to lots more information:

http://www.historylink102.com/Rome/roman-roads.htm

http://www.academickids.com/encyclopedia/index.php/Roman_road

http://rome.mrdonn.org/romanroads.html

roman road construction. 3

Ancient Rome Short Quiz!

 

1.  Who is the main character of this week’s lesson?

2.  Find a photo of a dictator from World War II

3.  Find an illustration of “crossing the Rubican”.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Julius Caesar!

Julius Caesar

Marble Bust of Julius Caesar

Check out these links:

http://rome.mrdonn.org/caesar.html

http://www.roman-empire.net/republic/caesar-index.html

http://www.history.com/topics/julius-caesar